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Sexual Assault Awareness Month: Home

This guide displays content pertaining to sexual assault, including statistics and definitions, survivor resources, medical information, and community resources. It was created in conjunction with the Wofford Wellness Center.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2022

What is Sexual Assault?

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, "[s]exual violence is any type of unwanted sexual contact.  This includes words and actions of a sexual nature against a person's will and without their consent."  Sexual assault is a form of sexual violence often reinforced by "social norms that condone violence, use power over others, traditional constructs of masculinity, the subjugation of women, and silence about violence and abuse."  Victims of sexual assault belong to all types of demographic groups, but females, particularly those of color, are affected more than any other group.  Aggressors target people they know significantly more than strangers, and some victims are assaulted by a partner or significant other, impacting the decision to report the assault.  

The effects of sexual violence permeate an individual's and community's well-being.  A victim's physical, economic, and psychological health often suffer tremendously, at risk of sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancy, injuries, medical costs, post-traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, and isolation.  Communities suffer feelings of disbelief, anger, and fear when sexual assault takes place, destroying their illusion of peace and safety, not to mention the loss of the victim's valuable contributions to society as they cope with their trauma.  In the face of our collective loss, preventing sexual violence should remain a focus in all social contexts - at home, at work, in the community, in schools, and in our own neighborhoods.  Each person has a role to play in eliminating sexual assault and supporting survivors.  Contact your local organizations for ways to get involved.

~ Adapted from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center's "About Sexual Assault" page... 

Did you know....?

Sexual Assault Statistics

Librarian

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Erin Davis
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Contact:
Sandor Teszler Library
429 N. Church St.
Spartanburg, SC 29303
864-597-4320